How to Prepare a Study Timetable for JEE Mains

Clearing the JEE Mains is a herculean task for many. The negative marking system makes sure everyone dreads the exam and the complexity of the questions ensures stress and tensions within all. Statistics show that over 1,00,000 students give the examination in hopes of clearing and getting into the engineering stream irrelevant of the branch in which they choose to specialize in. Sadly, only 15,000 are able to get through and others are left hanging in Hows and whys.

So what can be done?

JEE preparation can be tough if not thought through smartly and wisely. It is very important for the candidate to plan out how all aspects of the syllabus that must be covered in the 2 year preparation time available. A JEE applicant must be ready to face the preparation time with all sincerity, utmost hard work and sensible planning. For this, it’s best to prepare a well-sorted Timetable.

What is the importance of a timetable?

A timetable, whose power if harnessed in the right way, can be the most important link to your JEE clearance. Sit down, grab a paper and pen and think through how a study timetable can be prepared that suits your college and class timings. The timetable will help you cover maximum planned syllabus in the allotted time thus keeping you one step ahead of the game.

What should be briefly thought through will preparing one?

A number of things must be thought through while preparing a timetable. Try first by enlisting the essentials:

  • The syllabus completion in the time that’s in your hand
  • Importance of equal distribution of dedication and time to each subject
  • A periodic that’s feasible with your study routines and ability that also pushes you to aim for higher

If you can master your Timetable making skills, the dream of scoring well in JEE is not too far.

What are the things that should be taken into consideration while preparing a timetable?

  1. Firstly, plan out a timetable that suits your bodily capabilities. Don’t be too unrealistic about it.
  2. Concentrate on clearing out your concepts to the maximum from your NCERT text first and keep a special period to solve JEE based questions on the matter you’ve studied that day itself.
  3. Prepare a timetable that’s comfortable to follow but also increases your productivity daily. Make sure you follow the events listed on your timetable carefully with the precision of about 95% if not more.
  4. Be sincere and true to yourself about the completion of syllabus and learning the matter.
  5. Allot a period in the week where you ask your peers or teachers your doubts and make sure you get them cleared.
  6. Miss out an event because you were busy with college/class submissions or a long-awaited movie or an exciting match was aired? Be prepared for such situations as well by studying overtime before or after that day or allow a specific slot of the weekend to make up for the stuff missed. Win some, lose some.
  7. Your timetable should also contain fair hours for sleeping, eating, exercising daily. A healthy body contributes to a healthy mind.
  8. Also, remember to have fun with it. This is one period of your life you won’t get back. Take it in a stride and strive to do your best. Don’t close off completely; be within crowds that discuss problems and make you ponder over equations. Be true to your learning process because that, in fact, is the purpose of all your efforts.

 

How to Improve Concentration in Studies?

HOW TO IMPROVE CONCENTRATION

Distractions or barriers to concentration fall into two categories, internal or external.  Examples of internal barriers are hunger, drowsiness, daydreaming, and lack of interest, personal worries, and anxiety.

External barriers include environmental distractions such as other people, radio/television, outside noise, lack of proper study space.

The first step in improving concentration is to recognize the distraction and take action to correct it.

INTERNAL BARRIERS

BARRIER                                                                                                                                                                REMEDY

Hunger/drowsiness Proper rest and nutrition are essential for good academic performance.  Try to get at least seven hours of sleep each night.  A diet rich in grains, vegetables, and fruit, but low in fat and sugar is recommended.  It will provide natural and sustained energy.
Daydreaming If your mind starts to wander, jot down the interrupting thought so you can deal with it later.  In the meantime, continue to study.  Or, try the opposite approach, when you start to drift off, recall the most important points of what you’ve just read, then allow yourself to daydream.  When you’re ready to return to your study materials, do so.
Lack of interest Find a reason to be motivated.  Try to focus on positive reasons for doing well in the course such as higher GPA or personal growth.  Talk to your professor and classmates and examine their perspectives.
Anxiety/intimidation about studying Learn the various skills and strategies that lead to effective studying.  If you are overwhelmed by the tasks at hand, break it down into smaller tasks.  Remember that planning and time management is crucial.
Personal worries Identify the problem and take steps to resolve it.  Talk with someone who can help; a friend, a counsellor or a specialist.

EXTERNAL BARRIERS

Auditory – Conversation, radio, television, environmental noise Avoid all conversation when studying.  Consider a “Do Not Disturb” sign on your dorm door to discourage visitors.  Turn off your cell phone.  While TV or radio can be distracting, continuous music (as found on a CD) might be conducive to studying.  Keep it low so that it is more like a background sound.  Instrumental music is probably preferable to music with lyrics.
Visual Study in an area that lacks any visual stimuli that might distract you.  For example, if you study in the library, steer clear of the high traffic areas.  Stay away from windows or settings that cause your attention to be directed elsewhere.
When studying, keep only the materials related to that subject in viewing range.  Don’t allow the temptation to be distracted by your other classes.
Disorganization Before starting study sessions be sure to have all necessary material in front of you.  This eliminates the need to break concentration and search for an item.  Make a point of keeping all your study materials in a particular place and when it’s time to study you’ll know where everything is.

Whether you find yourself plagued by internal or external factors, keep in mind that:

HIGHEST CONCENTRATION = MINIMAL DISTRACTION

Brand IIT

Defining the IIT brand

It is useful to recall the circumstances in which it was born and subsequently nurtured. Although the Nalini Ranjan Sarkar Committee had submitted its report in 1946, it was after independence that action was taken on the report. Therefore, it was free India’s first professional institution, conceived of and built by Indians for the unique developmental needs of a free India.

The NR Sarkar Committee used global benchmarking to define standards without knowing the term by stating, “the proposed institutes should attain a standard not less than Manchester and Massachusetts”. There was value seen in the use of international faculty as evidenced by the presence of Professor R A Kraus and Professor H Tischner in the original academic team.

The word brand was not used those days, but Brand IIT evolved through the consistent and credible actions of the early leaders. The vision was articulated in very rich words by N R Sarkar at the time of the inauguration in August 1951 when he wrote, “IIT must build a high tradition, on which its future success must depend…” The first director, Dr J C Ghosh, said about the skill to be taught, “…capacity to organize thought, to correlate facts and ideas logically, and express them well…”.

To assess the results of 51 years of IIT, one has relied on published literature, as well as on a specially designed Quick Brand Survey (QBS). In the QBS, 50 IITians were interviewed from all the institutes, across age groups, but mostly from the corporate world.

The alumni have spoken very evocatively about what this brand is all about: India’s biggest, global brand; after IIT, it was a cakewalk at IIMC, Harvard and Carnegie Mellon. Narayana Murthy explained how his son could not secure admission into IIT, so he went to the Ivy League School at Cornell instead! CBS anchor Lesley Stahl described the summation of Harvard, MIT, and Princeton as representing an idea of the status of IIT. During the QBS interview, IIT-ians were asked about their top-of-the-mind, spontaneous recall with respect to IIT.

Four themes emerged: superlative students, door opener, meritocracy, not just studies. These are exemplified by actual quotations that are very evocative and powerful.

In the QBS, respondents were asked to describe the images in their minds. They used words and expressions that meant speed, brightness, energy, life, hope and so on. The imagery is a resplendent island in an ocean that is only lightly bathed in faint moonlight. Perhaps exaggerated, but real imagery! In responding to what feelings IIT evoked in them, respondents spoke in paradoxical terms: superiority, pride, and accomplishment accompanied by humility! When asked what unique contributions IIT had made to their development, they chose five themes: problem-solving attitude, education to handle life, high standards, the spirit of community and challenging. It is difficult to achieve these even by design, so truly they are fantastic outcomes.

If somehow we could replicate these outcomes in more educational institutions in this country, truly it can be said that we would have an unstoppable India.

Let us remember one thing about marketing and branding. It does not matter how much other people agree or disagree with these views of IITians, the purveyors or carriers of Brand IIT.

These words used by IITians reflect a reality about their own mindsets and attitudes. And that is what defines the essence of the IIT brand.

It is useful to recall the circumstances in which it was born and subsequently nurtured. Although the Nalini Ranjan Sarkar Committee had submitted its report in 1946, it was after independence that action was taken on the report.

Therefore, it was free India’s first professional institution, conceived of and built by Indians for the unique developmental needs of a free India.

The NR Sarkar Committee used global benchmarking to define standards without knowing the term by stating, “the proposed institutes should attain a standard not less than Manchester and Massachusetts”.

There was value seen in the use of international faculty as evidenced by the presence of Professor R A Kraus and Professor H Tischner in the original academic team.

The word brand was not used those days, but Brand IIT evolved through the consistent and credible actions of the early leaders. The vision was articulated in very rich words by N R Sarkar at the time of the inauguration in August 1951 when he wrote, “IIT must build a high tradition, on which its future success must depend…” The first director, Dr J C Ghosh, said about the skill to be taught, “…capacity to organize thought, to correlate facts and ideas logically, and express them well…”.

To assess the results of 51 years of IIT, one has relied on published literature, as well as on a specially designed Quick Brand Survey (QBS). In the QBS, 50 IITians were interviewed from all the institutes, across age groups, but mostly from the corporate world.

The alumni have spoken very evocatively about what this brand is all about: India’s biggest, global brand; after IIT, it was a cakewalk at IIMC, Harvard and Carnegie Mellon.

Narayana Murthy explained how his son could not secure admission into IIT, so he went to the Ivy League School at Cornell instead! CBS anchor Lesley Stahl described the summation of Harvard, MIT, and Princeton as representing an idea of the status of IIT.

During the QBS interview, IITians were asked about their top-of-the-mind, spontaneous recall with respect to IIT. Four themes emerged: superlative students, door opener, meritocracy, not just studies. These are exemplified by actual quotations that are very evocative and powerful.

In the QBS, respondents were asked to describe the images in their minds. They used words and expressions that meant speed, brightness, energy, life, hope and so on. The imagery is a resplendent island in an ocean that is only lightly bathed in faint moonlight. Perhaps exaggerated, but real imagery! In responding to what feelings IIT evoked in them, respondents spoke in paradoxical terms: superiority, pride, and accomplishment accompanied by humility! When asked what unique contributions IIT had made to their development, they chose five themes: problem-solving attitude, education to handle life, high standards, a spirit of community and challenging. It is difficult to achieve these even by design, so truly they are fantastic outcomes.

If somehow we could replicate these outcomes in more educational institutions in this country, truly it can be said that we would have an unstoppable India. Let us remember one thing about marketing and branding. It does not matter how much other people agree or disagree with these views of IITians, the purveyors or carriers of Brand IIT. These words used by IITians reflect a reality about their own mindsets and attitudes. And that is what defines the essence of the IIT brand.

Changes in IIT

The government announced major changes in the Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) for IITs and other participating institutes on 12th September 2005. These changes will be in effect from next year (2006).

1. Only Students who secure first class (60%) or equivalent in the plus two examinations will be eligible for admission to the IITs. However, there will be a relaxation of 5% for SC/ST students.

2. Unlike the present two-tier examination (screening and mains), JEE will be a single objective type examination, which could include short write-ups on various topics followed by objective questions based on write-ups.

3. The number of attempts has also been brought down to two. Students would be allowed to take the JEE in the year they pass the 12th standard examination and the following year only. Students seeking IIT admissions from next year on cannot ignore their Class XII exams_a first class in the board exam (at least 60%) is the new eligibility for IITadmissions. Only two JEE attempts will be allowed and anyone who joins an IIT can’t take the examination again to aim for a higher rank.

These are among the key changes in the IIT admission process after a review by a task force headed by Idi Chandy, ex-JEE chairman. Its suggestions were accepted by the IIT Council Standing Committee chaired by C N R Rao and comprising all IIT Directors.

The changes:

1. JEE will continue to be the admission test but a first class or equivalent in the Class XII board exam is a must. Relaxation of 5% for SC/ST students.

2. JEE format will change: it will now have short write-ups on various topics followed by objective questions on the write-up. This would test comprehension as well as analytical skills.

3. JEE will be only one test: existing preliminary screening test will be done away with.

4. Students can take JEE in the year in which they graduate from Class XII and the following year. Those who join any IIT cannot take JEE again.

HRD officials said the new process will be reviewed after next year. Said Sanjay G Dhande, Director IIT Kanpur: “The new system is an attempt to see how best we can make the selection…It may not be the final word but is an attempt to ensure that the best of talent is selected.”

The human resources development minister, who officiates as the chairman of the IIT council, has approved the changes suggested by the IIT standing committee. The new format IIT-JEE will be a single objective-type examination. It will include a short write-up on a topic in physics, chemistry or even mathematics, followed by objective questions based on the write-up. This will test the comprehension, as well as the analytical ability of students.

Since .00, the IIT-JEE is conducted in two parts. The screening test eliminates nearly 90% of the candidates, while the main examination selects nearly 4,000 students. Nearly 2 lakh candidates appear for the screening test; of these, only 20,000 appear for the main examination. According to a senior HRD official.The change in the IIT exam is part of the ministry.s overall strategy to reduce exam stress…

In an attempt to re-introduce a degree of seriousness about the school-leaving exam (class XII boards), students will now have to secure at least 60% marks to qualify to appear for the JEE, with SC/ST students getting a 5% relaxation.

This may spell doom for coaching towns like Kota, where students are put through rigorous training for the IIT-JEE examination, while the school-leaving exam is treated as a mere formality.

It has also been suggested that a student is allowed to appear for the JEE in the year that he/she has appeared for board examination and once more the next year.

In other words, each aspirant gets a maximum of two attempts at making it through to the IIT. However, those who get through one of the seven IITs will not be allowed to appear for the JEE again. Often students re-appear for the JEE in order to improve their scores in a bid to gain admission in a course or an IIT with a better reputation. The procedure will be reviewed after JEE .06. In order to reduce the stress associated with preparing for the IIT-JEE, as well as curtail the over-dependence on coaching schools, the IIT standing committee had suggested simplifying the syllabus. The standing committee felt that such a move will help give credit to the school system, as well as enhance the credibility of the Board examination.

A final view on this is yet to be taken. Surendra Prasad, deputy director at IIT Delhi, told ET. Details will only be worked out after the meeting of IIT directors and chairmen on the 17th, according to a senior ministry official, the issue of the syllabus for the exam has been left to the IITs to work out…

A special task force headed by Idi Chandy, ex-JEE chairman, was constituted by directors of the seven IITs to evaluate the entrance examination process. The recommendations were deliberated upon by the standing committee of the IIT council in July, chaired by CNR Rao and comprising directors of all the IITs.